Health Canada seizes sex enhancement products from Metro Vancouver stores

Health Canada is warning residents of British Columbia and Alberta that multiple unauthorized sex enhancement and workout products have been seized from stores because they pose serious health risks. 

The federal health department issued the safety advisory on May 6 for several retail and warehouse locations across the Lower Mainland and Alberta. Several of the outlets are located in the Metro Vancouver region, including multiple Fantasy Factory stores, a Fuel Supplements & Food Bar in Coquitlam, and a Muscle Complex Supplements in International Village Mall in Vancouver. 

You can find an updated list of the recalled products online with Health Canada.

The various unauthorized health products are promoted for sexual enhancement but they may pose serious health risks. Some of the possible risks include:

  • They may contain ingredients not listed on the label. This includes ingredients like prescription drugs, possibly at doses exceeding maximum recommended amounts. Prescription drugs should be taken only under the supervision of a health professional because they may cause serious side effects. Using a product that contains ingredients that the consumer is not aware of increases the chance of dangerous allergies and interactions with other medications and foods.
  • The label may indicate a dangerous ingredient or combination of ingredients. For example, it could list a drug that should be available only by prescription from a health care professional, or a combination of ingredients that Health Canada does not permit because of serious health risks.

The advisory comes after numerous other safety notifications from Health Canada, which warn of similar risks. For example, a drug like dapoxetine is sometimes used to treat premature ejaculation but is not authorized for sale in Canada. Side effects include fainting or loss of consciousness, dizziness, changes in blood pressure, blurred vision, seizures, headache, diarrhea and nausea. 

What you should do

  • Stop using the products. Consult your health care professional if you have used these products and have health concerns, and for advice on which health products are best for you and your family.
  • Read product labels to verify that health products have been authorized for sale by Health Canada. Authorized health products have an eight-digit Drug Identification Number (DIN), Natural Product Number (NPN) or Homeopathic Drug Number (DIN-HM). You can also check if products have been authorized for sale by searching Health Canada’s Drug Product Database and Licensed Natural Health Product Database.
  • Report any health product adverse events or complaints to Health Canada.

Find out more information with Health Canada.

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